pedicle

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin pedīculus ("little foot"), diminutive of pēs.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pedicle (plural pedicles)

  1. (zoology) A fleshy line used to attach and anchor brachiopods and some bivalve molluscs to a substrate.
    • 1867, William Henry Smyth, The Sailor's Word-Book[1]:
      A species of shell-fish, often found sticking by its pedicle to the bottom of ships, doing no other injury than deadening the way a little: "Barnacles, termed soland geese In th' islands of the Orcades."
  2. (zoology) The attachment point for antlers in cervids.
    • 1910, John T. McCutcheon, In Africa[2]:
      His long, rakish horns are mounted on a pedicle that extends above his head, thus accentuating the droll length of his features.
  3. A stalk that attaches a tumour to normal tissue
    • 1859, Joseph Maclise, Surgical Anatomy[3]:
      --Figure 3. Fig. 4, Plate 58, represents the neck of the bladder and neighbouring part of the urethra of an ox, in which a polypous growth is seen attached by a long pedicle to the veru montanum and blocking up the neck of the bladder.
    • 1896, George M. Gould, Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine[4]:
      One of these women, a secundipara, had gone two weeks over time, and had a large ovarian cyst, the pedicle of which had become twisted, the fluid in the cyst being sanguineous.
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    • 1914, Alexander Teixeira De Mattos, The Mason-bees[5]:
      One of the ends is lengthened out into a neck or pedicle, which is as long as the egg proper.
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