reprobate

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin reprobatus (disapproved, rejected, condemned), past participle of reprobare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

reprobate (comparative more reprobate, superlative most reprobate)

  1. (rare) Rejected; cast off as worthless.
    • Bible, Jer. vi. 30
      Reprobate silver shall men call them, because the Lord hath rejected them.
  2. Rejected by God; damned, sinful.
  3. Immoral, having no religious or principled character.
    The reprobate criminal sneered at me.
    • Milton
      And strength, and art, are easily outdone / By spirits reprobate.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

reprobate (plural reprobates)

  1. One rejected by God; a sinful person.
  2. An individual with low morals or principles.
    • Sir Walter Raleigh
      I acknowledge myself for a reprobate, a villain, a traitor to the king.
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
      "Good morning, Mrs. Denny," he said. "Wherefore this worried look on your face? Has that reprobate James been misbehaving himself?"
Translations[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin reprobare.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛpɹəbeɪt/

Verb[edit]

reprobate (third-person singular simple present reprobates, present participle reprobating, simple past and past participle reprobated)

  1. To have strong disapproval of something; to condemn.
  2. Of God: to abandon or reject, to deny eternal bliss.
  3. To refuse, set aside.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

(Classical) IPA(key): /re.proˈbaː.te/

Verb[edit]

reprobāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of reprobō