sweer

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English swer, sware, from Old English swǣr, swār (heavy, of great weight, oppressive, grievous, painful, unpleasant, great, sad, feeling or expressing grief, grave, slow, dull, sluggish, slothful, indolent, inactive from weakness, enfeebled, weak), from Proto-Germanic *swēraz, *swērijaz (heavy), from Proto-Indo-European *swēr- (heavy). Cognate with West Frisian swier (heavy, burdensome, onerous, pregnant), Dutch zwaar (heavy, hard, difficult), German schwer (difficult, hard, heavy), Swedish svår (hard, severe, difficult, heavy), Latin sērius (earnest, serious), Lithuanian swarus (heavy), Albanian var (to hang, burden, annoy), Ancient Greek ἕρμα (hérma, prop, foundation, reef, hill).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sweer (comparative more sweer, superlative most sweer)

  1. (UK dialectal) Heavy.
  2. (UK dialectal) Dull; indolent; lazy.
  3. (UK dialectal) Reluctant; unwilling; disinclined.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch zweren, from Middle Dutch sweren, from Old Dutch *swerien, sweren, from Proto-Germanic *swarjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *swer-.

Verb[edit]

sweer (present sweer, present participle swerende, past participle gesweer)

  1. to swear

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English swǣr. Cognate with West Frisian swier, Dutch zwaar, German schwer, Swedish svår.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sweer (comparative mair sweer, superlative maist sweer)

  1. reluctant, unwilling
  2. sad, depressed
  3. lazy
  4. depressing

Related terms[edit]

Quotations[edit]

  • 2000, The flouer's bonniness minded him o cantier times but the rose itsel wis mingin wi sweir connotations. But n Ben A-Go-Go p.6