QED

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See also: Q.E.D.

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

QED

  1. Quod erat demonstrandum (Latin what had to be proved or what was to be demonstrated); placed at the end of a mathematical proof to show that the theorem under discussion is proved.
    • 1999, William Dunham, Euler: The Master of Us All, Mathematical Association of America 1999, p. 64:
      By Cases 1 and 2, we see that any finite collection of 4k – 1 primes cannot contain all such primes. Thus there are infinitely many primes of this type. Q.E.D.

Usage notes[edit]

When used to end a mathematical proof, QED is somewhat archaic or traditional; textbooks often use a graphical symbol instead. Further, other languages generally use a vernacular abbreviation, such as French CQFD (ce qu'il fallait démontrer); QED is primarily used in English and Hungarian.

Related terms[edit]

  • (what was to be demonstrated): QEF

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

QED

  1. Quantum electrodynamics.
    • 2011, Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw, The Quantum Universe, Allen Lane 2011, p. 176:
      QED is the theory that explains how electrically charged particles, like electrons, interact with each other and with particles of light (photons).

Related terms[edit]

  • (quantum): QCD

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Initialism[edit]

QED

  1. QED

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin QED.

Interjection[edit]

QED

  1. (sciences) QED

Synonyms[edit]