Singularitarian

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See also: singularitarian

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Singularity +‎ -arian, popularized by Ray Kurzweil who credits the term to the extropian Mark Plus (1991).[1]

Noun[edit]

Singularitarian (plural Singularitarians)

  1. (rare) Someone who supports the technological singularity theory.
    • 2018, Corey Pein, chapter VIII, in Live Work Work Work Die: A Journey into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley[1], Metropolitan Books, →ISBN:
      Rather, Kurzweil writes, he became a Singularitarian as a result of “practical” efforts to make “optimal tactical decisions in launching technology enterprises.” Startups showed him the way! Being a Singularitarian, Kurzweil claims, “is not a matter of faith but one of understanding.” This is a refrain Singularitarians share with Scientologists, for L. Ron Hubbard always marketed his doctrines as “technology”.

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Singularitarian (comparative more Singularitarian, superlative most Singularitarian)

  1. Relating to the technological singularity theory.
    • 2010, Jonathon Keats, Virtual Words: Language on the Edge of Science and Technology, Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 142:
      “The Coming Technological Singularity” has often been credited with launching a so-called Singularitarian movement.
    • 2018, Corey Pein, chapter VIII, in Live Work Work Work Die: A Journey into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley[2], Metropolitan Books, →ISBN:
      There was always something fundamentally misanthropic about the Singularitarian vision, with its drive for the elimination of the body and its echoes of Christian millenarianism.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jonathon Keats (2010) Virtual Words: Language on the Edge of Science and Technology, Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 142

Further reading[edit]