Talk:pour féliciter

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Tea room discussion[edit]

Note: the below discussion was moved from the Wiktionary:Tea room.

Is the phrase "pour féliciter" or its initialism "PF" used on New Year's greeting cards in the U.S., U.K., Canada, Australia or other English speaking countries? Or is it at least used in speech?

The entry pour féliciter has the phrase as a term used in English, while the Czech Wikipedia tells me the phrase is used only in Czech; that's why the question. --Dan Polansky 13:10, 1 January 2009 (UTC)

  • I don't think it's used in English. I've never seen it in Britain. Ƿidsiþ 10:41, 2 January 2009 (UTC)
  • I've never seen it in English but I've been speaking English for 41 years and in the book I'm reading I've seen at least three other words that I've also never seen before. So me not having seeing it is not a perfect metric. Try Google Books or looking in other dictionaries. — hippietrail 11:14, 9 January 2009 (UTC)

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I've already posted this to Tea room, but this seems to be a better place: Is the phrase "pour féliciter" or its initialism "PF" used on New Year's greeting cards in the U.S., U.K., Canada, Australia or other English speaking countries? Or is it at least used in speech?

Czech Wikipedia tells me the phrase is used only in Czech. --Dan Polansky 18:19, 2 January 2009 (UTC)

It was really inappropriate to place Britain amongst other English speaking countries, when it is in fact the cradle and pillar of English language. Consequently, I shall oppose this deletion fervently, until some British native English speaker confirms that it is justified. The uſer hight Bogorm converſation 06:29, 6 April 2009 (UTC)
FYI: Ƿidsiþ hails form the UK and he commented in the Tea room. --Duncan 09:32, 6 April 2009 (UTC)

Deleting English senses only. — Carolina wren discussió 01:50, 5 April 2009 (UTC)