anecdoton

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English[edit]

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Noun[edit]

anecdoton (plural anecdota)

  1. (Grecian) Alternative spelling of anecdote
    • 1823: Daniel Waterland, The Works of the Rev. Daniel Waterland, page 170 (also in works from: 1843, 1850, 1856, 2008)
      9. There is another, in the library of St. German de Prez, about 500 years old. Montfaucon, having met with it, published it1 as an anecdoton; not knowing that it was Bruno’s comment. It is not indeed quite so full, nor any thing near so correct as the printed copies : but still it is plainly Bruno’s comment. The title, Tractatus de Fide Catholica.
    • 1871: The Academy, № 2, page 356 (J. Murray)
      While on the subject of Olympiodorus, we have a brief word to say in connection with his Scholium on 474 A, which Dr. Thompson conceives to contain an anecdoton from Heraclitus.
    • 1895: The Expositor, series 5: volume 1, page 424 (Hodder and Stoughton)
      [] strictly speaking, an anecdoton : the greater part of Jerome’s Notes on the Psalter has long been accessible in the Breviarium in Psalmos which appears among his printed works.
    • 1897: Texts and Studies: Contributions to Biblical and Patristic Literature, volume 5 (1897–1899), page xlv (also: 1967 &: [1], [2])
      I publish here, as elsewhere in this volume, what is not exactly an anecdoton, but a more original form of a writing already known.
    • 1900: James Hastings, Ann Wilson Hastings, and Edward Hastings, The Expository Times, volume 11 (October 1899 – September 1900), page 82 (T. & T. Clark)
      The publication has not the stirring interest of an anecdoton, especially an anecdoton like that of the Sinai-Palimpsest or the Hebrew Original of Sirach, but it has a threefold importance — linguistical, biblical, and ecclesiastical.
    • 1904: Journal of Theological Studies, volume 5 (1903–1904), page 218 (Macmillan)
      But inasmuch as my own text was in type before I knew that I had been anticipated in the discovery, and seeing also that the document is one which from its age and character deserves all the attention which students can bestow upon it, I have ventured, with Dr. Mercati’s full consent, to publish the treatise, although no longer an anecdoton, in the pages of the Journal.
    • 1937: J.-M. de Buck of Bibliothèque Royale de Beligique Brussels and Philip Edward Hallett (translator), Spiritual Exercises and Devotions of Blessed Robert Southwell, S.J., page ? (Sheed & Ward)
      The Brussels MS. is certainly an anecdoton. A few passages have been used, quite en passant, by historians of the English Martyrs who could not afford the leisure to do any more or perhaps never had access to the full text and had to be content []
    • 1964: Ben Edwin Perry, Secundus, the Silent Philosopher: The Greek Life of Secundus, Critically Edited and Restored So Far as Possible, Together with Translations of the Greek and Oriental Versions, the Latin and Oriental Texts, and a Study of the Tradition, page vii (American Philological Association)
      He had printed the first half of the biography as an anecdoton, omitted the questions which followed, because they had previously been edited by Holstenius, and fused the final paragraph of the biography with the paragraph which precedes []
    • 1977: Balasundara Gupta of the British Academy, Proceedings of the British Academy, volume 25 (1939), page 318 (G. Cumberlege, Oxford University Press)
      Mention should also be made of the important edition of Bale’s Index Britanniae Scriptorum, in which the late Miss Mary Bateson was his collaborator, and which appeared as an Anecdoton Oxoniense in 1902.
    • 1985: Clifford Truesdell, Archive for History of Exact Sciences, volume 34, page 30 (Springer-Verlag)
      Bernoulli first discussed the problem in an “Anecdoton” written sometime after he had seen Taylor’s Methodus but not published until 1742.

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