apprize

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See appraise.

Verb[edit]

apprize (third-person singular simple present apprizes, present participle apprizing, simple past and past participle apprized)

  1. Archaic form of appraise.

Etymology 2[edit]

See apprise (etymology 1).

Verb[edit]

apprize (third-person singular simple present apprizes, present participle apprizing, simple past and past participle apprized)

  1. Archaic form of apprise.
    • a. 1720 (date written), Joseph Addison, “Section VI. Excellency of the Christian Institution.”, in The Evidences of the Christian Religion, [], London: [] J[acob] Tonson [], published 1730, OCLC 70350680, subsection I, pages 46–47:
      Thus far vve ſee hovv the learned Pagans might apprize themſelves from oral information of the particulars of our Saviour's hiſtory.
    • 1741, [Samuel Richardson], “Letter XXX”, in Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded. [], volume I, 3rd edition, London: [] C[harles] Rivington, []; and J. Osborn, [], OCLC 1264825423, page 117:
      As ſhe is a mighty Letter-vvriter, I hope ſhe has had the Duty to apprize you of her Intrigue vvith the young Clergyman; []
    • a. 1798 (date written), Horace Walpole, chapter XVII, in Denis Le Marchant, editor, Memoirs of the Reign of King George the Third. [], volume I, London: Richard Bentley [], published 1845, OCLC 963723230, page 258:
      [] Fox, he said, he knew would not have engaged in the management of the Parliament, had he been apprized that he (Bute) intended to retire, and it had been necessary to the King's affairs that Fox should carry them through the session.
    • 1817 October 23, Lord Byron, “Letter CCC. To Mr. Murray.”, in Thomas Moore, editor, Letters and Journals of Lord Byron: With Notices of His Life, [], volume II, London: John Murray, [], published 1830, OCLC 629975661, page 151:
      P.S. Morlands have not yet written to my bankers apprizing the payment of your balances; pray desire them to do so.
Conjugation[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See apprise (etymology 2).

Verb[edit]

apprize (third-person singular simple present apprizes, present participle apprizing, simple past and past participle apprized)

  1. Archaic form of apprise.
    • 1614, Daniell Dyke [i.e., Daniel Dyke], “The Answering of the Obiection which the Deceitfull Heart of Man Might Gather out of the Former Doctrine of the Heartes Deceitfulnesse”, in I[eremiah] D[yke], editor, The Mystery of Selfe-deceiving. Or A Discourse and Discouery of the Deceitfulnesse of Mans Heart: [], London: [] Edward Griffin, for Ralph Mab, [], OCLC 779929891, page 401:
      Theſe [people] muſt remember, hovv highly God apprizeth good purpoſes, and deſires, accepting, and revvarding them, vvhen they come to him, as if they came accompanied vvith the deeds themſelues.
Conjugation[edit]

Anagrams[edit]