assimilable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin assimilabilis.

Adjective[edit]

assimilable (comparative more assimilable, superlative most assimilable)

  1. Capable of being assimilated; susceptible to assimilation.
    • 1654, Walter Charleton, Physiologia Epicuro-Gassendo-Charltoniana, or, A Fabrick of Science Natural, London: Thomas Heath, Book 3, Chapter 15, Section 3, p. 381,[1]
      [] very deep and large wounds are many times soon healed of themselves; i. e. meerly by the goodness of Nature it self, which being vigorous, and of our own provision furnished with convenient means, wholesom and assimilable Blood, doth every moment freshly apply it to the part that hath suffered solution of Continuity, and thereby redintegrate the same:
    • 1917, Rabindranath Tagore, “My School” in Personality: Lectures Delivered in America, London: Macmillan, p. 141,[2]
      He was not like other teachers, a mere vehicle of text-books. He made his teaching personal, he himself was the source of it, and therefore it was made of life stuff, easily assimilable by the living human nature.
    • 1977, Karl Popper and John Eccles, The Self and Its Brain, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983, Part 2, Chapter E7, p. 371,[3]
      Sometimes there are such bizarre experiences that the dream seems not at all assimilable to anything that happened in the remembered life, but may have some deeper meaning that we don’t know, as Freud conjectured.
    • 2002, Anne Karpf, “We’ve been here before,” The Guardian, 8 June, 2002,[4]
      British postwar immigration policy deliberately excluded Jews (and non-white immigrants) because it didn’t consider them assimilable.

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /a.si.mi.labl/
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Adjective[edit]

assimilable (plural assimilables)

  1. assimilable.

Further reading[edit]