atremble

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

a- +‎ tremble

Adjective[edit]

atremble (not comparable)

  1. Trembling.
    Synonym: aquiver
    • 1863, Jean Ingelow, “Afternoon at a Parsonage” in Poems, London: Logmans, Green, Reader & Dyer, p. 174,[1]
      When the poplar leaves atremble
      Turn their edges to the light,
    • 1906, Upton Sinclair, The Jungle, New York: Doubleday, Page, Chapter 15, p. 181,[2]
      To Jurgis this man’s whole presence reeked of the crime he had committed; the touch of his body [] set every nerve of him a-tremble []
    • 1922, E. R. Eddison, The Worm Ouroboros, New York: Ballantine Books, 1952, Chapter 25, p. 375,[3]
      [] he beheld a tear a-tremble on her eyelid.
    • 1982, Stephen King, Cujo, p. 45,[4]
      When her stomach felt better (but her legs were all atremble again, something lost, something gained), she looked at herself in the bathroom mirror.