consociate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin cōnsociātus, past participle of cōnsociō (to associate, unite).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (noun) IPA(key): /kənˈsəʊsiət/, /kənˈsəʊʃiət/
    • (file)
  • (verb) IPA(key): /kənˈsəʊsieɪt/, /kənˈsəʊʃieɪt/

Noun[edit]

consociate (plural consociates)

  1. (obsolete) An associate; an accomplice.
    • 1654, Joseph Hall, Select Thoughts, or Choice Helps for a Pious Spirit
      wicked consociates

Verb[edit]

consociate (third-person singular simple present consociates, present participle consociating, simple past and past participle consociated)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) to associate, partner
    • 1662, Henry More, "An Antidote Against Atheism", Book III, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 129:
      "In the first place therefore, it cannot but amuse a mans mind to think what these officious Spirits should be that so willingly sometimes offer themselves to consociate with a man: [] "
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To bring into alliance, confederacy, or relationship; to bring together; to join; to unite.
    • 1747, David Mallet, Amyntor and Theodora
      Join pole to pole, consociate severed worlds.
  3. (US) To unite in an ecclesiastical consociation.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “consociate” in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

consociate

  1. feminine plural of consociato

Participle[edit]

consociate f pl

  1. feminine plural of consociato

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

consociate f

  1. plural of consociata

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

consociate

  1. inflection of consociare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

cōnsociāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of cōnsociō