dialetheism

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Coined by Graham Priest and Richard Routley, from di- +‎ Ancient Greek ἀλήθεια (alḗtheia, truth), in 1981.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌdaɪ.əˈlɛθ.i.ɪz.əm/

Noun[edit]

dialetheism (usually uncountable, plural dialetheisms)

  1. (logic) The theory that statements can be both true and false at the same time and in the same sense. The opposite of the law of noncontradiction. [from 1981]
    • 2005, Laurence Goldstein, Logic: key concepts in philosophy, page 158:
      [It] is important to point out that endorsing dialetheism is not the same as rejecting logic or rational argumentation.

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References[edit]

  • Priest, Graham. 'Dialetheism', Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2008.
  • Priest, Graham, Sylvan, Richard, Norman, Jean, and Arruda, Ayda Ignez (eds.). Paraconsistent Logic: Essays on the Inconsistent. München: Philosophia Verlag. 1989: p. xx

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