distrait

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French distrait.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈstreɪ/, /ˈdɪstreɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Adjective[edit]

distrait (comparative more distrait, superlative most distrait)

  1. absent-minded, troubled, distracted

Translations[edit]

Quotations[edit]

  • 1908: Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge (Norton 2005, page 1238)
    I noticed that after my host had read it he seemed even more distrait and strange than before.
  • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, hardback edition, page 50
    Seated upon the fallen hornbeam, Mrs Thoroughfare was regarding distraitly the sky.
  • 1996: John Le Carré, The Tailor of Panama (Knopf 1996, hardback edition, page 221) "Forgive me for being a fraction distrait today. We're trying to prevent another war."

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French destrait, past participle of destraire (modern distraire), from Latin distrahere (distract).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

distrait m (feminine distraite, masculine plural distraits, feminine plural distraites)

  1. absent-minded
  2. With their mind set on something else.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

distrait

  1. past participle of distraire