familism

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin familia +‎ -ism.

Noun[edit]

familism (usually uncountable, plural familisms)

  1. (religion, now historical) The beliefs or practice of the Family of Love religious sect, active in sixteenth century England. [from 16th c.]
    • 1972, Christopher Hill, The World Turned Upside Down, Folio Society, published 2016, page 15:
      Familism was spread in England by Christopher Vittels, an itinerant joiner of Dutch origin.
  2. A form of social structure in which the needs of the family as a group are more important than the needs of any individual family member. [from 19th c.]
    • 2004, Kathleen Malley-Morrison, Denise A. Hines, Family violence in a cultural perspective, page 151:
      Familism is one of the most important cultural values in all Latino groups.
    • 2009, John Bruhn, The Group Effect: Social Cohesion and Health Outcomes, page 139:
      Familism denotes the normative commitment of family members to the family, and to family relationships [...].
    • 2010, May L. Wykle, Sarah H. Gueldner, Aging Well: Gerontological Education for Nurses, page 496:
      A central component of familism is the expectation that children will be the primary caregivers for their parents [...].

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1997, Kyriakos S. Markides, Manuel Miranda, Minorities, Aging, and Health, page 282:
    The cultural value of la familia or familism was first identified by Hispanic writers in the 1970s. Maldonado (1979) defines familism as the centrality of the family among its members.
  • 1999, Webster's New World Dictionary, page 512 (definition of familism):
    "a form of social structure in which the needs of the family as a group are more important than the needs of any individual family member"