fley

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English fleien, from Old English flēgan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fley (third-person singular simple present fleys, present participle fleying, simple past and past participle fleyed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To frighten.
    • 1860, James Phillips Kay, Scarsdale; or, Life on the Lancashire and Yorkshire border:
      The Jack O'Lanthron was among the reeds again last night, and some of my neighbours are sore fleyed.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To be frightened.

Anagrams[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fley, from Proto-Germanic *flawją.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fley n (genitive singular fleys, nominative plural fley)

  1. (poetic) ship, boat

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English flēa.

Noun[edit]

fley

  1. Alternative form of fle

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English flȳġe.

Noun[edit]

fley

  1. Alternative form of flye

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English flēogan.

Verb[edit]

fley

  1. Alternative form of flien