gníid

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Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *gniyeti, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (to beget).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gníid (conjunct ·gní, verbal noun gním)

  1. to do
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 3c30
      na·gníu-sa iárnairgairiu
      I do it after it is forbidden.
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 143a6
      Is hinonn persan gnís ⁊ fo·daim.
      It is the same person who acts and suffers.
  2. to work
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 51b10
      .i. intan as·mber Duaid intellectum tibi dabo, sechis ardi son do·mbera Dia do neuch nod·n-eirbea ind 7 genas triit [...]
      i.e. when David said intellectum tibi dabo, that is to say, it a sign that God will give to everyone who shall trust in Him, and work through him...

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
gníid gníid
pronounced with /ɣ(ʲ)-/
ngníid
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]