litigate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lītigāre, present active infinitive of lītigō; which, in its turn, stems from lītem (a quarrel) + agō (do, practice).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

litigate (third-person singular simple present litigates, present participle litigating, simple past and past participle litigated)

  1. (intransitive, construed with on) To go to law; to carry on a lawsuit.
    • 1988, Bobby McFerrin (lyrics), “Don't Worry, Be Happy”, in Simple Pleasures, performed by Bobby McFerrin:
      Ain't got no place to lay your head / Somebody came and took your bed / Don't worry, be happy / The landlord say your rent is late / He may have to litigate
  2. (transitive) To contest in law.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Ido[edit]

Verb[edit]

litigate

  1. adverbial present passive participle of litigar

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

litigate f pl

  1. plural of litigata

Verb[edit]

litigate

  1. second-person plural present of litigare
  2. second-person plural present subjunctive of litigare
  3. second-person plural imperative of litigare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

lītigāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of lītigātus