logomachy

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin logomachia, from the Ancient Greek λογομαχία (logomakhía).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ləʊˈɡɒ.mə.kɪ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /loʊˈɡɑ.mə.ki/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

logomachy (plural logomachies)

  1. Dispute over the meaning of words
  2. A conflict waged only as a battle of words
    • 1911, G. K. Chesterton, “The Secret Garden”, in 'The Innocence of Father Brown':
      He was left over the coffee with Brayne, the hoary Yankee who believed in all religions, and Valentin, the grizzled Frenchman who believed in none. They could argue with each other, but neither could appeal to him. After a time this “progressive” logomachy had reached a crisis of tedium; Lord Galloway got up also and sought the drawing-room.

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