pelagus

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek πέλαγος ‎(pélagos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pelagus n ‎(genitive pelagī); second declension

  1. the sea
    • Letter attributed to Pope Callixtus II:
      In pelagis multarum aquarum crebro cecidi, proximus morti, et evasit codex minime infectus, me exeunte.
    • 17th century, Aristotealoys problematon tmema to ie, p. 179:
      Quae tamen tolli potest, si dixerimus, comparata aqua in pelagis, id est in medio maris, sed in superficie, cum aqua in profundo medii maris, verissimus esse; [...]
  2. (rare) the plain, especially in the Aeneid

Inflection[edit]

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Second declension, nominative/accusative/vocative in -us.

Case Singular Plural
nominative pelagus pelagē
pelagī
genitive pelagī pelagōrum
dative pelagō pelagīs
accusative pelagus
pelagum
pelagē
pelagōs
ablative pelagō pelagīs
vocative pelagus pelagē
pelagī
  • In general, pelagus is used only in the singular. Rarely, the nominative/accusative/vocative plural form pelagē occurs, borrowed from the Greek original. Likewise rare is the dative/ablative plural pelagīs.
  • There is also accusative singular pelagum, which implies masculine gender.
  • The Ancient Greek genitive plural is πελαγῶν ‎(pelagôn), while the Latin second declension genitive plural ends in -ōrum or contracted in -ûm (also spelled -um).

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]