priest-ridden

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

priest +‎ -ridden

Adjective[edit]

priest-ridden (comparative more priest-ridden, superlative most priest-ridden)

  1. Dominated or plagued by priests.
    Ireland has often been described as a priest-ridden country
    • 1691, William Carr, An Accurate Description of the United Netherlands, and of the Most Considerable Parts of Germany, Sweden, & Denmark, London: Timothy Childe, p. 83,[1]
      Cologne [] is much decayed within these Hundred Years, having been much Priest-ridden; a Misfortune that hath undone many other great Cities. The Jesuits have had so great Influence upon the Magistrates, that they prevailed with them to banish all Protestants []
    • 1726, William Rufus Chetwood, The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Robert Boyle, London: J. Watts, 3rd edition, 1735, p. 150,[2]
      The Father finding the Man had too much Understanding to be Priest-ridden, thought it his best way to hold his Tongue.
    • 1873, Bret Harte, “The Adventure of Padre Vicentio” in Mrs. Skaggs’s Husbands, and Other Sketches, Boston: James R. Osgood, p. 302,[3]
      [] Padre Vicentio incautiously drove his heavy spurs into the flanks of his mule as that puzzled animal was hesitating on the brink of a steep declivity. Whether the poor beast was indignant at this novel outrage, or had been for some time reflecting on the evils of being priest-ridden, has not transpired; enough that he suddenly threw up his heels, pitching the reverend man over his head, and, having accomplished this feat, coolly dropped on his knees and tumbled after his rider.
    • 1916, James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, New York: B. W. Huebsch, Chapter 1, p. 38,[4]
      We are an unfortunately priestridden race and always were and always will be till the end of the chapter.