profond

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French profond, from Old French profont, modified, based on its Latin origin, from parfunt, parfont, from Latin profundus. Spelt profont in Old French, the d was later added back to reflect the original Latin spelling.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

profond (feminine singular profonde, masculine plural profonds, feminine plural profondes)

  1. deep
    le lac est profond de 100 mètres
    the lake is 100 metres deep
  2. profound
  3. (of a region, country or continent, sometimes derogatory) rural, small-town, provincial, heartland; authentic, true
    la Wallonie profonde, la France profonde, l'Afrique profonde(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    • 2014, Charles de Gaulle, Lettres, notes et carnets, tome 4 : 1941-1943, Plon (→ISBN)
      Mais les Nations Unies ont les moyens de faire échouer ce plan de Hitler et la France profonde, la vraie France, espère de toute son âme qu'elles sauront les employer.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian profondo, from Latin profundus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

profond (feminine singular profonda, plural profondi)

  1. deep
    Synonyms: fond (the most usual word), għammieq

Related terms[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French profont.

Adjective[edit]

profond m (feminine singular profonde, masculine plural profonds, feminine plural profondes)

  1. deep (of water, etc.)

Noun[edit]

profond m (plural profonds)

  1. bottom (lowest part)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: profond

References[edit]

  • profond on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)