stincan

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Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stinkwaną.

Verb[edit]

stincan

  1. to give off a smell

Inflection[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Dutch: stinken
    • Dutch: stinken
      • Afrikaans: stink
    • Limburgish: stinke

Further reading[edit]

  • stinkan”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stinkwaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈstinkɑn/, [ˈstiŋkɑn]

Verb[edit]

stincan

  1. to smell (give off a scent)
    • c. 995, Ælfric, Extracts on Grammar in English
      Oleō: iċ stince swōte.
      Oleo: I smell sweet.
    • late 9th century, Old English Martyrology
      Þā āhlēop se līchama sōna upp of þām wætere and þæt hēafod on ōðre stōwe, and se līchama stanc and þæt hēafod swā swōte swā rosan blōstma and līlian.
      Then the body suddenly jumped out of the water, along with the head in another place, and the body and the head both smelled as sweet as a blossom of roses and lilies.
  2. to stink (smell bad)
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, John 11:39
      Se Hǣlend cwæþ, "Dōþ anweġ þone stān." Þā cwæþ Martha tō him, "Dryhten, nū hē stincþ: hē wæs for fēower dagum dēad."
      Jesus said, "Take away the stone." Then Martha said, "Lord, by now he’s going to stink: he's been dead for four days."
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, Lives of Saints
      Þā hālgan wurdon ġebrōhte tō blindum cwearterne þǣr manna līċ lǣgon þe wǣron ǣr ācwealde on þām cwearterne ġefyrn, þā wēollon eall maðum eġeslīċe stuncon.
      The saints were taken to a dark prison where they found the corpses of people who had long since been killed there, which were swarming with maggots and stank horribly.

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]