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Alternative forms[edit]


From Middle English sucuren, from Old French secorre, sucurir ‎(to rescue, remedy), from Latin succurrō ‎(go beneath, run for cover, run for help, verb), from sub- + currō ‎(run, verb). More at sub-, current.



succor ‎(uncountable)

  1. (archaic or obsolete) Aid, assistance or relief given to one in distress; ministration.
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], The Shepheardes Calender: Conteyning Tvvelue Æglogues Proportionable to the Twelue Monethes. Entitled to the Noble and Vertuous Gentleman most Worthy of all Titles both of Learning and Cheualrie M. Philip Sidney, London: Printed by Hugh Singleton, dwelling in Creede Lane neere vnto Ludgate at the signe of the gylden Tunne, and are there to be solde, OCLC 606515406; republished in Francis J[ames] Child, editor, The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser: The Text Carefully Revised, and Illustrated with Notes, Original and Selected by Francis J. Child: Five Volumes in Three, volume III, Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company; The Riverside Press, Cambridge, published 1855, OCLC 793557671, page 406, lines 222–228:
      Now stands the Brere like a lord alone, / Puffed up with pryde and vaine pleasaunce. / But all this glee had no continuaunce: / For eftsones winter gan to approche; / The blustering Boreas did encroche, / And beate upon the solitarie Brere; / For nowe no succoure was seene him nere.



succor ‎(third-person singular simple present succors, present participle succoring, simple past and past participle succored)

  1. (transitive) To give such assistance.



Derived terms[edit]