syllaba

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Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

syllaba (plural syllabas)

  1. syllable

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek συλλαβή (sullabḗ), from σύν (sún, with, together) + λαμβάνω (lambánō, I take).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

syllaba f (genitive syllabae); first declension

  1. syllable
  2. (figuratively, in the plural) poems, verses

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative syllaba syllabae
genitive syllabae syllabārum
dative syllabae syllabīs
accusative syllabam syllabās
ablative syllabā syllabīs
vocative syllaba syllabae

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • syllaba in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • syllaba in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • syllaba” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to lengthen the pronunciation of a syllable or letter: syllabam, litteram producere (opp. corripere) (Quintil. 9. 4. 89)
    • this word ends in a long syllable: haec vox longa syllaba terminatur, in longam syllabam cadit, exit
    • a verbal, petty critic; a caviller: syllabarum auceps