titubant

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French titubant, present participle of tituber, from Latin titubāre (falter), present active infinitive of titubō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈtɪtəbənt/, /ˈtɪtʃəbənt/

Adjective[edit]

titubant (comparative more titubant, superlative most titubant)

  1. stumbling, staggering; with the movement of one who is tipsy
    • 1896, Robert Louis Stevenson, Macaire, act i, scene 2 (stage directions)
      To these, by the door L. C., the CURATE and the NOTARY, arm in arm; the latter owl-like and titubant
    • 1928, Acta Psychiatrica et Neurologica‎, volume 3, page 65
      His walk had become titubant.
    • 1948, Karl Pearson, Treasury of Human Inheritance: Nervous Diseases and Muscular Dystrophies‎, page 253
      her feet showed the typical Friedreich's deformity; her speech was drawling and monotonous; her gait was staggering and titubant

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

titubant

  1. present participle of titubar

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

titubant

  1. present participle of tituber

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

titubant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of titubō