wear out one's welcome

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English[edit]

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Verb[edit]

wear out one's welcome

  1. (idiomatic) To behave in an offensive, burdensome, or tiresome manner, with the result that one's continued presence is unwanted within a residence, commercial establishment, or social group.
    • 1889, Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno, ch. 16:
      No: he feared to "wear out his welcome," he said: they had "seen enough of him for one while".
    • 1921, William MacLeod Raine, Tangled Trails, ch. 30:
      "Well, I don't aim to have no truck with you at all," blustered the fat man. "You've just naturally wore out yore welcome with me before ever you set down. I'll ask you to go right now."
    • 2005, "Presidential Cat Tales," Time, 3 Nov.:
      The pet, appropriately named Tiger, wore out his welcome very quickly. "Evidently Tiger was a real 'Conan the Destroyer' beastie," reports Harding.

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