ó-

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Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ó- and ú-, from Proto-Germanic *un-, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥-, a prefix use of the particle *ne (not). In Faroese this changed very early from ú- to ó-.

Cognate with Old English un- (English un-) Old Saxon un-, Dutch on-, Old High German un- (German un-, Swedish o-, Norwegian u), and Gothic 𐌿𐌽- (un-). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek α- (a-), αν- (an-), Latin in-, and Old Irish in-.

Prefix[edit]

ó-

  1. un-


Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ó- and ú-, from Proto-Germanic *un-, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥-, a prefix use of the particle *ne (not). In Icelandic this changed very early from ú- to ó-.

Cognate with Old English un- (English un-) Old Saxon un-, Dutch on-, Old High German un- (German un-, Swedish o-, Norwegian u), and Gothic 𐌿𐌽- (un-). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek α- (a-), αν- (an-), Latin in-, and Old Irish in-.

Prefix[edit]

ó-

  1. un-, non-, in-
    ó- + friður (peace) → ófriður (war)
    ó- + heppni (luck) → óheppni (bad luck)
    ó- + þekkur (well-behaved) → óþekkur (naughty)
    ó- + happ (a stroke of luck) → óhapp (accident)
    ó + samlína (collinear) → ósamlína (noncollinear)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]