Talk:Chief of Party

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RFD discussion: February 2013–March 2014[edit]

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Chief of Party

A designated chief of a party. Or is it by some fine distinction contrasted with chief of staff? Or an alternative form? Capitalisation is an issue, if to be kept. — Pingkudimmi 14:03, 23 February 2013 (UTC)

Move entry to chief of party. I think at least some of the three senses are usually lower case in running text.
Move to RfV. It needs to be cited and contextualized.
This is presented as a capitalized common noun. I would imagine that any proper noun (ie a title of an official position would be capitalized). I don't know why we have Prime Minister and President as separate entries, unless we are into glorification of the roles and the holders thereof. Usage notes at or, better, referenced at the corresponding lower-case entry seem much better and less like idolatry. DCDuring TALK 16:34, 23 February 2013 (UTC)
I wonder if it is an Anglicization of chef de partie. SemperBlotto (talk) 22:15, 23 February 2013 (UTC)

I am seeing this title frequently on LinkedIn members' profiles. Your entry provided under "Chief of Party" provided the first usable definition. I am also seeing it abbreviated as COP. —This comment was unsigned.

Moved to RFV. - -sche (discuss) 18:54, 28 February 2014 (UTC)


RFV discussion: February–July 2014[edit]

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Chief of Party

Moved from RFD. - -sche (discuss) 18:54, 28 February 2014 (UTC)

Minuscule spelling seems more widely used than the capitalized version > "Alternative capitalization of chief of party" ? --Hekaheka (talk) 04:36, 1 March 2014 (UTC)
I expect that the lemma should be lowercase, yes... but which senses are citable? - -sche (discuss) 05:13, 1 March 2014 (UTC)
1 and 3 are essentially the same. Judging by a quick BGC search, it looks rare/dated but attestable. The second sense is rare-ish but in use. I saw the president of the United States and the mayor of New York called "chief of party" when they were in a role of supporting some fellow-partisan's campaign for a public office. --Hekaheka (talk) 10:20, 1 March 2014 (UTC)
Sense 1 cited. — Ungoliant (falai) 22:50, 10 July 2014 (UTC)
Sense 1 passed, senses 2 and 3 failed. — Ungoliant (falai) 17:37, 24 July 2014 (UTC)