Talk:serve

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Verbal definitions[edit]

The pletora of longworded definitions make this article extremely cumbersome. Furthermore is looks like an incomplete merger of 2 separate articles...

Prime candidates for merging are:

  • 1 & 17 and possibly 18
    • To work for; to labor in behalf of; to exert one's self continuously or statedly for the benefit of; to do service for; to be in the employment of, as an inferior, domestic, serf, slave, hired assistant, official helper, etc.; specifically, in a religious sense, to obey and worship.
    • To be a servant or a slave; to be employed in labor or other business for another; to be in subjection or bondage; to render menial service.
    • To perform domestic offices; to be occupied with household affairs; to prepare and dish up food, etc.
  • 6 & 19:
    • To perform the duties belonging to, or required in or for; hence, to be of use to; as, a curate may serve two churches; to serve one's country.
    • To be in service; to do duty; to discharge the requirements of an office or employment. Specifically, to act in the public service, as a soldier, seaman. etc.
  • 11 & 12
    • To bring to notice, deliver, or execute, either actually or constructively, in such manner as the law requires; as, to serve a summons.
    • To make legal service opon (a person named in a writ, summons, etc.); as, to serve a witness with a subpeona.

And possibly more...--sanna 17:40, 12 July 2006 (UTC)

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The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for deletion.

This discussion is no longer live and is left here as an archive. Please do not modify this conversation, though feel free to discuss its conclusions.


serve

Rfd-redundant: (intransitive) To be in service; to do duty; to discharge the requirements of an office or employment. Specifically, to act in the public service, as a soldier, seaman. etc.

Just a few lines up, we have the sense "(transitive) To perform the duties belonging to, or required in or for; hence, to be of use to." The usexes given suggest that these two are the same. It can probably be used both in intransitive and transitive forms. -- Prince Kassad 10:38, 2 March 2011 (UTC)

I agree, and this is not the only redundancy in the entry. Actually, somebody has posted a request for clean-up of the whole. Who would want to give it a try? --Hekaheka 14:08, 2 March 2011 (UTC)
Keep. Unabridged dictionaries rarely combine transitive and intransitive uses into a single sense, except for rare or obsolete senses. This is a typical Websters 1913 entry with what Visviva called "cobwebs" (semicolons, many circumlocutions for the same sense, mini-usexes introduced by "as" in the sense line, dashes}. User:Visviva/Cobwebs has four lists. DCDuring TALK 22:54, 2 March 2011 (UTC)
  • I'm going to close this here and deal with it under the existing RFC request. Ƿidsiþ 06:14, 24 April 2011 (UTC)