Talk:so

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Under which of the English meanings should you put the "so" in:
"I was hungry and so I ate something"?
In this instance, it's a synonym of "therefore," right? As such, it should be an adverb. However, this usage isn't listed on this page —This unsigned comment was added by 70.244.205.206 (talk) at 22:12, 9 November 2008.

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so

One small section of this looks to be a mistake. Anyone more learned than me care to take a look. ===Adverb=== '''so''' # [[very|Very]]. #: ''He is '''so''' good!'' #: ''It’s not '''so''' bad.''

To me, ignorant as I am, this looks more like adjective use than adverb use.--Richardb 12:00, 14 May 2007 (UTC)

So in "so good" and "so bad" is an adverb. Try translating them into some languages that differentiate adjectives and adverbs more clearly and you will see. —Stephen 13:13, 20 May 2007 (UTC)


So...[edit]

"'So' Pushes to the Head of the Line". at [1] or [2] May 22, 2010, New York Times. - Just noting; not sure where or how to add it in here. Quiddity 01:29, 9 July 2010 (UTC)

Grand so.[edit]

Does this count as a different use http://www.google.com/search?q=%22grand+so%22&hl=en&tbo=1&tbs=cloc:c,cl_loc:ireland&num=10&lr=&ft=i&cr=countryIE&safe=off so, in this case, meaning "in that case" or "then". Not just with "grand" but usually Kanjo Kotr 14:48, 29 October 2010 (UTC)

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so

===Adverb=== sense: therefore: He ate too much cake, so he got sick; He wanted a book, so he went to the library.

Isn't this a conjunction? I mean, therefore is an adverb, but this is not used the same way: therefore is used only to modify a sentence ("He ate too much cake; therefore, he got sick"), whereas so is used only to connect sentences. If I'm right that this belongs under ===Conjunction===, then its definition and translation table need fixing also.​—msh210 17:02, 26 April 2010 (UTC)

"So" instead of "Well"[edit]

I hear a lot of people using "so" where one should use "well". Someone is asked a question, and instead of starting his answer with "Well, ...", he starts with "So ...". I remember a friend of mine doing that at least as far back as 2001, but it seems to be getting more common (unfortunately!). Eric Kvaalen (talk) 13:16, 26 February 2012 (UTC)

"there is so a (something)"[edit]

None of our senses explains to me sentences like "There is so a Santa Claus!" or "And what do you know, the State listened, and decreed that yes, Mr. B., there is so a Plan B." [3] What does the "so" do there - does it emphasize the verb "be" which can't be emphasized by "do"? I mean, you can say "I do believe in Santa", but not "there does be a Santa", so do you say "there is so a Santa" instead? Or am I off the mark? --Thrissel (talk) 18:38, 1 May 2013 (UTC)

Sounds right to me. We also say simply, "It IS SO!" when contradicting someone who claims something is not the case. Eric Kvaalen (talk) 12:28, 1 June 2013 (UTC)