abord

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English aborden, from abord.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abord (plural abords)

  1. (archaic) Manner or way of approaching or accosting; address. [since the early 1600s]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chesterfield to this entry?)

Verb[edit]

abord (third-person singular simple present abords, present participle abording, simple past and past participle aborded)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To approach. [attested from around 1400 until the late 1600s]
  2. (transitive, rare) To accost. [since the early 1600s]
    • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, hardback edition, page 82:
      Mrs Hurstpierpoint aborded her with a smile.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 6

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from aborder, from Old French aborder (to hit a ship in order to board it), from bord (side of a ship, edge), from Frankish *bord (side of a ship or vessel), from Proto-Germanic *burdą (edge, border, side), from Proto-Indo-European *bheredh- (to cut). Cognate with Old High German bort (edge, rim, rand), Old English bord (ship, side of a ship), Old Norse borð (edge, side of a vessel). More at board.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abord m (plural abords)

  1. (literary) The manner with which one acts in the presence of another person or persons, especially in a first encounter.
  2. (rare) The surroundings of a place.
  3. (archaic) Arrival or accessibility by water.

Usage notes[edit]

  • In the sense "surroundings", the word is almost always a pluralia tantum.
  • The sense "manner of acting" is usually now perceived as a backformation from aborder (to approach), and is most common in the expression être d'un abord and variations of it.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French a + bord (exterior of a ship)

Adverb[edit]

abord

  1. On board; into or within a ship or boat
  2. (nautical) Alongside.

Preposition[edit]

abord

  1. On board of; onto or into a ship, boat, train, plane.