caduceus

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English[edit]

A caduceus

Etymology[edit]

Via Latin cādūceus, cādūceum, adaptation of Doric Ancient Greek καρύκειον (karúkeion, herald’s wand or staff). This and Attic Greek κηρύκειον (kērúkeion) are derived from κῆρυξ (kêruks, herald, public messenger). Related to κηρύσσω (kērússō, I announce).

Noun[edit]

caduceus (plural caducei)

  1. The official wand carried by a herald in ancient Greece and Rome, specifically the one carried in mythology by Hermes, the messenger of the gods, usually represented with two snakes twined around it.
  2. A symbol () representing a staff with two snakes wrapped around it, used to indicate merchants and messengers, and also sometimes as a symbol of medicine.

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

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Wikipedia

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cādūceus m (genitive cādūceī); second declension

  1. Alternative form of cādūceum.

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cādūceus cādūceī
genitive cādūceī cādūceōrum
dative cādūceō cādūceīs
accusative cādūceum cādūceōs
ablative cādūceō cādūceīs
vocative cādūcee cādūceī