desolate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Latin desolatus, past participle of desolare (to leave alone, make lonely, lay waste, desolate), from solus (alone).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

desolate (comparative more desolate, superlative most desolate)

  1. Deserted and devoid of inhabitants.
    a desolate isle; a desolate wilderness; a desolate house
    • Bible, Jer. ix. 11
      I will make Jerusalem [] a den of dragons, and I will make the cities of Judah desolate, without an inhabitant.
    • Tennyson
      And the silvery marish flowers that throng / The desolate creeks and pools among.
  2. Barren and lifeless.
  3. Made unfit for habitation or use; laid waste; neglected; destroyed.
    desolate altars
  4. Dismal or dreary.
  5. Sad, forlorn and hopeless.
    He was left desolate by the early death of his wife.
    • Keble
      voice of the poor and desolate

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

desolate (third-person singular simple present desolates, present participle desolating, simple past and past participle desolated)

  1. To deprive of inhabitants.
  2. To devastate or lay waste somewhere.
  3. To abandon or forsake something.
  4. To make someone sad, forlorn and hopeless.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

desolate

  1. inflected form of desolat

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

desolate f pl

  1. feminine plural of desolato

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

dēsōlāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of dēsōlātus