ed-

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ed-, from Old English ed- (again, re-), from Proto-Germanic *idi-, *idi, *ida (back, backwards, again), from Proto-Indo-European *et, *at (and, but). Cognate with German dialectal it- (again, back), Icelandic ið- (again, back), Gothic [script?] (id-, again, back), Welsh ad-, ed- (again, back), Latin et (and), Latin at (but, moreover).

Prefix[edit]

ed-

  1. (obsolete, no longer productive) A prefix of Old English origin meaning "again", "back", "anew", equivalent to re-.
    eddish, eddy, edgrow, edgrowth, ednew, edquicken

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • ed- in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *idi- (back, backwards, again). Akin to Old Saxon idug-, Old High German id-, ida- (German dialect it-), Old Norse ið-, Gothic 𐌹𐌳-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

ed-

  1. forming words with sense of "anew" or "again"; "against", "backwards"
    ednīwian "to renew, refresh, restore"
    edlǣċan "to repeat"
    edwīt "disgrace, reproach, shame"
    edwierpan "to recover, amend, improve"
  2. turning
    edēa "whirlpool, eddy"

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *idi- (back, backwards, again). Related to idug-.

Prefix[edit]

ed-

  1. forming words with sense of "against", "backwards"
    edwindan "to hurl, precipitate"