foreward

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

fore +‎ -ward

Noun[edit]

foreward (plural forewards)

  1. (obsolete) An advance group; the vanguard.

Adverb[edit]

foreward

  1. Misspelling of forward.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English foreweard, foreward (condition, bargain, agreement, contract, treaty, assurance), equivalent to fore- +‎ ward (ward, keeping). Liken Dutch voorwaarde (condition, terms, proviso, stipulation). More at fore-, ward.

Noun[edit]

foreward (plural forewards)

  1. agreement, contract, treaty, bargain, covenant; terms of an agreement; pledge or promise
    Pers, I plihte þe my trouþe To folfulle þe Foreward. — Piers Plowman, c1390
    To tak or ȝef temporal þing for goostly þing of forþword or certeyn couenaunt, it is symonye. — An Apology for Lollard Doctrines, Attributed to Wicliffe, c1475

References[edit]

  • Middle English Dictionary
  • A Concise Dictionary of Middle English, Mayhew and Skeat

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From fore- +‎ -weard.

Adjective[edit]

fōreward

  1. forward, fore, former, early, prior
    On fórewardre ðyssere béc ys awriten be me
    In the fore part of this book it is written by me.
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From fore- +‎ ward (ward, keeping).

Noun[edit]

fōreward f (nominative plural fōrewarde)

  1. an agreement, compact, treaty
    His bróðer griþ and fórewarde eall æftercwæþ — His brother, peace and treaties renounced
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • 2010, J. Bosworth, An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), foreward