gaol

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: gaoł

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

The old Melbourne gaol

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gayole, gaylle, gaille, gayle, gaile, via Old French gaiole, gayolle, gaole, from Medieval Latin gabiola, for *caveola, a diminutive of Latin cavea (cavity, coop, cage).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gaol (plural gaols)

  1. (UK, Ireland, Australia) Alternative spelling of jail
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, The China Governess[1]:
      ‘[…] There's every Staffordshire crime-piece ever made in this cabinet, and that's unique. The Van Hoyer Museum in New York hasn't that very rare second version of Maria Marten's Red Barn over there, nor the little Frederick George Manning—he was the criminal Dickens saw hanged on the roof of the gaol in Horsemonger Lane, by the way—’

Usage notes[edit]

Gaol was the more common spelling between about 1760 and 1830,[1] and is still preferred in proper names in some regions. Most Australian newspapers use jail rather than gaol, citing either narrower print width or the possibility of transposing letters in gaol to produce goal.[2]

Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

gaol (third-person singular simple present gaols, present participle gaoling, simple past and past participle gaoled)

  1. (UK) Alternative spelling of jail

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=gaol%2Cjail&year_start=1700&year_end=2000&corpus=15
  2. ^ 1996, Sally A. White, Reporting in Australia, page 275

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish gáel (relationship), from Proto-Celtic *gailo- (compare Lithuanian gailùs (compassionate), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌹𐌻𐌾𐌰𐌽 (gailjan, gladden), German geil (wanton); Greek φίλιος (fílios, friendly)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gaol m (genitive gaoil, nominative plural gaolta)

  1. relationship, kinship; kindred feeling
  2. relation, kin; relative
  3. relation between things, connection

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gaol ghaol ngaol
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish gáel (relationship): Proto-Celtic *gailo-; compare Lithuanian gailùs (compassionate); Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌹𐌻𐌾𐌰𐌽 (gailjan, gladden), German geil (wanton); Greek φίλιος (fílios, friendly).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gaol m (genitive and plural gaoil)

  1. love, affection
    Tha gaol agam ort. ― I love you. (literally "is love at me on you")
    Ghabh i trom ghaol air. ― She fell madly in love with him.

Declension[edit]

Bare forms

Case Singular Plural
Nominative gaol gaoil
Dative gaol gaoil
Genitive gaoil gaol
Vocative a ghaoil a ghaola

Forms with the definite article

Case Singular Plural
Nominative an gaol na gaoil
Dative a' ghaol na gaoil
Genitive a' ghaoil nan gaol

Usage notes[edit]

The love expressed by gaol is more intimate in nature than that of gràdh.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]