garnish

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English garnischen, from Old French garniss-, stem of certain forms of the verb garnir, guarnir, warnir (to provide, furnish, avert, defend, warn, fortify, garnish), from a conflation of Old Frankish *warnjan (to refuse, deny) and *warnōn (warn, protect, prepare, beware, guard oneself), from Proto-Germanic *warnijaną (to worry, care, heed) and Proto-Germanic *warnōną (to warn); both from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (to defend, protect, cover). Cognate with Old English wiernan (to withhold, be sparing of, deny, refuse, reject, decline, forbid, prevent from, avert) and warnian (to warn, caution, take warning, take heed, guard oneself against, deny). More at warn.

Verb[edit]

garnish (third-person singular simple present garnishes, present participle garnishing, simple past and past participle garnished)

  1. To decorate with ornamental appendages; to set off; to adorn; to embellish.
    • Spenser
      All within with flowers was garnished.
  2. (cooking) To ornament, as a dish, with something laid about it; as, a dish garnished with parsley.
  3. To furnish; to supply.
    By his spirit he hath garnished the heavens; his hand hath formed the crooked serpent. (Job 26:13, KJV)
  4. (slang, archaic) To fit with fetters.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  5. (law) To warn by garnishment; to give notice to; to garnishee.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

garnish (plural garnishes)

  1. A set of dishes, often pewter, containing a dozen pieces of several types.
  2. Pewter vessels in general.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 4, p. 478:
      The accounts of collegiate and monastic institutions give abundant entries of the price of pewter vessels, called also garnish.
  3. Something added for embellishment; decoration; ornament; also, dress; garments, especially when showy or decorated.
    • Shakespeare
      So are you, sweet, / Even in the lovely garnish of a boy.
    • Prior
      Matter and figure they produce; / For garnish this, and that for use.
  4. (cooking) Something set round or upon a dish as an embellishment.
  5. (slang, obsolete) Fetters.
  6. (slang, historical) A fee; specifically, in English jails, formerly an unauthorized fee demanded from a newcomer by the older prisoners.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fielding to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]