caper

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening of capriole.

Noun[edit]

caper (plural capers)

  1. A frolicsome leap or spring; a skip; a jump, as in mirth or dancing; a prank.
  2. A crime, especially theft, or a narrative about such a crime.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

caper (third-person singular simple present capers, present participle capering, simple past and past participle capered)

  1. to leap or jump about in a sprightly manner; to cut capers; to skip; to spring; to prance; to dance.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch kaper.

Noun[edit]

caper (plural capers)

  1. A vessel formerly used by the Dutch; privateer.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin capparis.

Noun[edit]

caper (plural capers)

  1. The pungent grayish green flower bud of the European and Oriental caper (Capparis spinosa), which is pickled and eaten.
  2. A plant of the genus Capparis.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Shortening of capercaillie.

Noun[edit]

caper (plural capers)

  1. (Scotland) the capercaillie.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English cap

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

caper

  1. (finance) to cap (set a limit to)
  2. (sports) to cap (award a player a cap for playing for their national team)

Conjugation[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *kap-ro (buck, he-goat), *kapro; see also Old Norse hafr (he-goat), Old English hæfr, Welsh gafr, Old Irish gabor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

caper m (genitive caprī); second declension

  1. A male goat.
  2. vocative singular of caper

Inflection[edit]

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Number Singular Plural
nominative caper caprī
genitive caprī caprōrum
dative caprō caprīs
accusative caprum caprōs
ablative caprō caprīs
vocative caper
capre
caprī

Synonyms[edit]

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Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]