seize

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Earlier seise, from Middle English seisen, sesen, saisen, from Old French seisir (to take possession of; invest (person, court)), from Medieval Latin sacīre (to lay claim to, appropriate) (8th century) in the phrase ad propriam sacire, from Old Low Frankish *sakjan (to sue, bring legal action), from Proto-Germanic *sakjaną, *sakōną (compare Old English sacian (to strive, brawl)), from Proto-Germanic *sakaną (compare Old Saxon sakan (to accuse), Old High German sahhan (to bicker, quarrel, rebuke), Old English sacan 'to quarrel, claim by law, accuse').[1] See sake.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

seize (third-person singular simple present seizes, present participle seizing, simple past and past participle seized)

  1. (transitive) to deliberately take hold of; to grab or capture
  2. (transitive) to take advantage of (an opportunity or circumstance)
  3. (transitive) to take possession of (by force, law etc.)
    to seize smuggled goods
    to seize a ship after libeling
  4. (transitive) to have a sudden and powerful effect upon
    a panic seized the crowd
    a fever seized him
  5. (transitive, nautical) to bind, lash or make fast, with several turns of small rope, cord, or small line
    to seize two fish-hooks back to back
    to seize or stop one rope on to another
  6. (transitive, obsolete) to fasten, fix
  7. (intransitive) to lay hold in seizure, by hands or claws (+ on or upon)
    to seize on the neck of a horse
    The text which had seized upon his heart with such comfort and strength abode upon him for more than a year. (Southey, Bunyan, p. 21)
  8. (intransitive) to have a seizure
    • 2012, Daniel M. Avery, Tales of a Country Obstetrician
      Nearing what she thought was a climax, he started seizing and fell off her. Later, realizing he was dead, she became alarmed and dragged the body to his vehicle to make it look like he had died in his truck.
  9. (intransitive) to bind or lock in position immovably; see also seize up
    Rust caused the engine to seize, never to run again.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ C.T. Onions, ed., Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology, s.v. "seize" (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996), 807.
  • seize in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • seize” in OED Online, Oxford University Press, 1989.

French[edit]

French cardinal numbers
 <  15 16 17  > 
    Cardinal : seize
    Ordinal : seizième
French Wikipedia article on seize

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sēdecim.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • (file)

Numeral[edit]

seize

  1. sixteen

Derived terms[edit]


Guernésiais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French seize < Latin sēdecim.

Numeral[edit]

Guernésiais cardinal numbers
 <  15 16 17  > 
    Cardinal : seize

seize

  1. sixteen

Jèrriais[edit]

Jèrriais cardinal numbers
 <  15 16 17  > 
    Cardinal : seize

Etymology[edit]

From Old French seize, from Latin sēdecim.

Numeral[edit]

seize

  1. sixteen