gripe

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gripen, from Old English grīpan, from Proto-Germanic *grīpaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreyb- (to grab, grasp). Cognate with West Frisian gripe, Low German griepen, Dutch grijpen, German greifen, Danish gribe, Swedish gripa. See also grip, grope.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gripe (third-person singular simple present gripes, present participle griping, simple past and past participle griped)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To make a grab (to, towards, at or upon something).
  2. (archaic, transitive) To seize, grasp.
    • Robynson (More's Utopia)
      Wouldst thou gripe both gain and pleasure?
  3. (intransitive) To complain; to whine.
  4. To suffer griping pains.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of John Locke to this entry?)
  5. (nautical) To tend to come up into the wind, as a ship which, when sailing close-hauled, requires constant labour at the helm.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of R. H. Dana, Jr to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete, transitive) To pinch; to distress. Specifically, to cause pinching and spasmodic pain to the bowels of, as by the effects of certain purgative or indigestible substances.
    • Shakespeare
      How inly sorrow gripes his soul.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

gripe (plural gripes)

  1. A complaint; a petty concern.
  2. (nautical) A wire rope, often used on davits and other life raft launching systems.
  3. (obsolete) grasp; clutch; grip
    • Shakespeare
      A barren sceptre in my gripe.
  4. (obsolete) That which is grasped; a handle; a grip.
    the gripe of a sword
  5. (engineering, dated) A device for grasping or holding anything; a brake to stop a wheel.
  6. Oppression; cruel exaction; affiction; pinching distress.
    the gripe of poverty
  7. (chiefly in the plural) Pinching and spasmodic pain in the intestines.
  8. (nautical) The piece of timber that terminates the keel at the fore end; the forefoot.
  9. (nautical) The compass or sharpness of a ship's stern under the water, having a tendency to make her keep a good wind.
  10. (nautical) An assemblage of ropes, dead-eyes, and hocks, fastened to ringbolts in the deck, to secure the boats when hoisted.
  11. (obsolete) A vulture, Gyps fulvus; the griffin.
    • Shakespeare
      Like a white hind under the gripe's sharp claws.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Derived terms[edit]


North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian gripa, which derives from Proto-Germanic *grīpaną.

Verb[edit]

gripe

  1. (Mooring) to grab, to seize

Conjugation[edit]



Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse grípa (to grab), from Proto-Germanic *grīpaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreyb- (to grasp, grab). Cognate with Danish gribe, Swedish gripa, Icelandic grípa, English gripe, Dutch grijpen, German greifen.

Verb[edit]

'gripe

  1. To seize (grab, capture).
  2. To seize (take advantage of opportunity).

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gripiz. Cognate with Old High German grif- (German Griff), Old Norse gripr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gripe m

  1. grip, clutch, grasp

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

gripe f (plural gripes)

  1. The flu, influenza.

Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • gripa (Colombia, Mexico)

Etymology[edit]

French grippe, from gripper (to seize), of Germanic origin.

Noun[edit]

gripe f (plural gripes)

  1. The flu, influenza.

See also[edit]