grum

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English grom, from Old English grom, gram (angry, wrathful), from Proto-Germanic *gramaz (angry, bearing a grudge), from Proto-Indo-European *ghrem- (to rub, tear, scratch). Probably influenced in form by glum. Compare also Danish grum (cruel, atrocious, fell), Swedish grym (cruel, furious, terrible). Related to grim, gram.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grum (comparative grummer, superlative grummest)

  1. Morose, stern, surly, sullen.
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger Poeple's" Country, Nebraska 2005, p. 58:
      She cast a speculative look upon her husband, silent and grum as if he had been thus gruffly carved out of wood.
  2. Low, deep in the throat; guttural
    a grum voice

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grumus.

Noun[edit]

grum n (plural grumuri)

  1. (obsolete) pile, bundle, heap

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]