lout

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Of dialectal origin, compare Middle English louten "to bow, bend low, stoop over" from Old English lūtan from Proto-Germanic *leut-. Cognate with Old Norse lútr (stooping), Gothic 𐌻𐌿𐍄𐌾𐌽 (luton, to deceive). Non-Germanic cognates are probably Old Church Slavonic лоудити (luditi, to deceive)[1], Serbo-Croatian луд (lud) and Albanian lut (to beg, pray).

Noun[edit]

lout (plural louts)

  1. A troublemaker, often violent; a rude violent person; a yob.
  2. A clownish, awkward fellow; a bumpkin.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Philip Sidney to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

lout (third-person singular simple present louts, present participle louting, simple past and past participle louted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To treat as a lout or fool; to neglect; to disappoint.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Etymology 2[edit]

Old English lūtan, from Germanic. Cognate with Old Norse lúta, Danish lude (to bend), Norwegian lute (stoop), Swedish luta.

Verb[edit]

lout (third-person singular simple present louts, present participle louting, simple past and past participle louted)

  1. (intransitive, archaic) To bend, bow, stoop.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.i:
      He faire the knight saluted, louting low, / Who faire him quited, as that courteous was [...].
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, vol. 1:
      He took the cup in his hand and, louting low, returned his best thanks [...].

References[edit]

  1. ^ lout” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).