manger

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English[edit]

Manger.

Etymology[edit]

From Old French mangoire, menjoere, from mangier (to eat) (modern French manger).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

manger (plural mangers)

  1. A trough for animals to eat from.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French mangier, from Late Latin manducāre ‘to chew, devour’, present active infinitive of manducō, from Latin mandō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

manger

  1. (transitive) To eat.
    J'ai mangé de la viande pour le souper.
    I ate some meat for dinner.
  2. (intransitive) To eat.
    C'est bizarre que je ne mange rien.
    It's strange that I don't eat anything.
    Manger au restaurant.
    To eat in a restaurant.

Conjugation[edit]

  • This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written mange- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and ranger.

Noun[edit]

manger m (plural mangers)

  1. food, foodstuff.
    Un manger délicat.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Verb[edit]

manger

  1. to eat (consume food)

Conjugation[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Vallader) mangiar

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Old French mangier, from Latin mandūcō, manducāre.

Verb[edit]

manger

  1. (Puter) to eat

Related terms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

In standardised Rumantsch Grischun, mangiar is used for people eating and magliar for animals eating. When applied to people magliar means eating badly (eating like a pig). Some of the Romansch lects do not make this distinction (especially Sursilvan) and magliar is the usual term for human beings.