scant

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old Norse skamt, neuter of skammr (short)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

scant (comparative scanter, superlative scantest)

  1. Very little, very few.
    "After his previous escapades, Mary had scant reason to believe John."
  2. Not full, large, or plentiful; scarcely sufficient; scanty; meager; not enough.
    a scant allowance of provisions or water; a scant pattern of cloth for a garment
    • Ridley
      His sermon was scant, in all, a quarter of an hour.
  3. Sparing; parsimonious; chary.
    • Shakespeare
      Be somewhat scanter of your maiden presence.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

scant (third-person singular simple present scants, present participle scanting, simple past and past participle scanted)

  1. (transitive) To limit in amount or share; to stint.
    to scant someone in provisions; to scant ourselves in the use of necessaries
    • Shakespeare
      Scant not my cups.
    • Francis Bacon
      where man hath a great living laid together and where he is scanted
    • Dryden
      I am scanted in the pleasure of dwelling on your actions.
  2. (intransitive) To fail, or become less; to scantle.
    The wind scants.

Noun[edit]

scant (plural scants)

  1. (masonry) A block of stone sawn on two sides down to the bed level.
  2. (masonry) A sheet of stone.
  3. (wood) A slightly thinner measurement of a standard wood size.

Quotations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

scant (not comparable)

  1. With difficulty; scarcely; hardly.
    • Fuller
      So weak that he was scant able to go down the stairs.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]