sted

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See also: STED

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sted, from Old English place, spot, locality

Noun[edit]

sted (plural steds)

  1. (largely obsolete) Alternative spelling of stead.
    • 1500, Le Bone Florence of Rome
      They dud wyth hym as wyth þe dedd; They beryed hym in a ryall stedd.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser:
      And false Duessa in her sted had borne
    • 1927, Hélène Adeline Guerber, Myths of Greece and Rome[1], Library of Alexandria, ISBN 9781465523464:
      But in the gloomy court was rais'd a bed, / Stuff'd with black plumes, and on an ebon sted

Adverb[edit]

sted (not comparable)

  1. short for instead of

References[edit]

  • Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia Supplement, Vol. XII, Page 1269, sted, steddy

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse staðr (place).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /stɛd/, [sd̥ɛð]

Noun[edit]

sted n (singular definite stedet, plural indefinite steder)

  1. place
  2. spot
  3. passage, text
  4. homestead
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See stede (admit into the presence (of an authority))

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /stɛːd/, [sd̥ɛːˀð], [sd̥ɛðˀ]

Verb[edit]

sted

  1. Imperative of stede.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English stede (a place, spot, locality)

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sted (plural steds)

  1. a place, spot, locality
    Paradis is a priue stedd, þar mani mirthes er e-medd. — Cursor Mundi, c1400
    The kyng in þat Roche had non sted / Where that he Myhte hyden In his hed. — The History of the Holy Grail, c1450
  2. a position or place occupied by someone
    helpeth vp þat adoun was y-broȝthe; to hys kynd sted — English Conquest of Ireland, 1525
  3. a house, property
    All men o rome sal cum ... Tak vr folk and sted wit-all ... — Cursor Mundi, c1400
    ... broght hym fro hys strenkyþfull stedd To grete Rome agayne. — Le Bone Florence of Rome, 1500
  4. a state, condition
    more sche hath decerved to be ded / thanne evere dyde my modyr jn ony sted. — Merlin, 1450
    It..shul stand me in gret ste [read: sted] her if it mygth be do closly and suerly. — Paston Letters, 1465
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Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Middle English Dictionary

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse staðr

Noun[edit]

sted n (definite singular stedet, indefinite plural steder, definite plural stedene)

  1. place

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) stad
  • (Vallader) stà

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aestās, aestātem.

Noun[edit]

sted m (plural steds)

  1. (Puter) summer