truss

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Old French trousse.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

truss (plural trusses)

  1. A bandage and belt used to hold a hernia in place.
    • 2008, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, chapter 4, Professional Guide to Diseases, ISBN 0781778999, page 280:
      A truss may keep the abdominal contents from protruding into the hernial sac; however, this won't cure the hernia.
  2. (architecture) A structure made up of one or more triangular units made from straight beams of wood or metal, which is used to support a structure as in a roof or bridge.
  3. (architecture) A triangular bracket.
  4. An old English farming measurement. One truss of straw equalled 36 pounds, a truss of old hay equalled 56 pounds, a truss of new hay equalled 60 pounds, and 36 trusses equalled one load.
  5. (obsolete) A bundle; a package.
    • Spenser
      bearing a truss of trifles at his back
  6. (historical) A padded jacket or dress worn under armour, to protect the body from the effects of friction.
    • Drayton
      Puts off his palmer's weed unto his truss, which bore / The stains of ancient arms.
  7. (historical) Part of a woman's dress; a stomacher.
  8. (botany) A tuft of flowers formed at the top of the main stem of certain plants.
  9. (nautical) The rope or iron used to keep the centre of a yard to the mast.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

truss (third-person singular simple present trusses, present participle trussing, simple past and past participle trussed)

  1. (transitive) To tie up a bird before cooking it.
  2. (transitive) To secure or bind with ropes.
  3. (transitive) To support.
  4. To take fast hold of; to seize and hold firmly; to pounce upon.
    • Spenser
      who trussing me as eagle doth his prey
  5. To strengthen or stiffen, as a beam or girder, by means of a brace or braces.
  6. (slang, archaic) To execute by hanging; to hang; usually with up.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]