wode

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English, from Old English wōd (mad, raging, enraged, insane, senseless, blasphemous), from Proto-Germanic *wōdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wāt- (prophet). Cognate with Middle Dutch woet (Dutch woede), Old High German wuot (German Wut (fury)), Old Norse óðr, Gothic 𐍅𐍉𐌸𐍃 (wōþs, demonically possessed). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin vates (seer, prophet), Old Irish fáith (seer), Welsh gwawd (song).

Adjective[edit]

wode (comparative woder, superlative wodest)

  1. (archaic) Mad, crazy, insane, possessed, rabid, furious, frantic.
    • 1806, James Petite Andews, The History of Great Britain:
      My hair stode up, I waxed wode, my synewes all did shake / And, as the fury had me vext, my teeth began to quake.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English wōd, see above.

Noun[edit]

wode (uncountable)

  1. madness, insanity an overmastering emotion, rage, fury
    When thei saw hir for wode so wilde Thei did lede hir ... With-oute the toun ... And stoned hir to dethe. — The Laud Troy Book
    At cherche kan god ... yelde þe wyttes of þe wode.Ayenbite of Inwyt

Verb[edit]

wode (third-person singular simple present wodeth, present participle wodende, simple past and past participle woded)

  1. To be or go mad; be or go out of one's mind; behave wildly; be frenzied; go out of control.
    Vices woden to destroyen men by wounde of thought. — Chaucer
  2. to be or become furious, enraged.
    Whan I ne may my ladi se, The more I am redy to wraththe ... I wode as doth the wylde Se. — Gower
Conjugation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wode

  1. frantically
  2. ferociously, fiercely
  3. intensely, furiously
    Lat us to the peple seme Suche as the world may of us deme That wommen loven us for wod. — Chaucer
  4. furiously enraged, irate, angry
    He was wod wroth and wold do Thomas ... to deth. — Mirk's Festial: A Collection of Homilies by Johannes Mirkus
    When þe wale kyng wist, he wex wode wroth. — Wars of Alexander

Adjective[edit]

wode

  1. mad, insane, possessed, furious, frantic, mentally deranged, of unsound mind, out of one's mind.
  2. rabid
  3. wild, not tamed

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English wudu see wood.

Noun[edit]

wode

  1. wood (material).

Verb[edit]

  1. To hunt.
  2. To take to the woods; hide oneself in the woods (also reflexive: ben woded).

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]