Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
U+AE40, 김
HANGUL SYLLABLE GIM
Composition: + +
긿
[U+AE3F]
Hangul Syllables
[U+AE41]

Korean[edit]



긿

긔 ←→ 까

Etymology 1[edit]

(gim, “laver”)

First attested in the nineteenth century. Perhaps ultimately related to the "weed" sense below, but this is speculative.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ki(ː)m]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gim
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gim
McCune–Reischauer?kim
Yale Romanization?kīm
  • South Gyeongsang (Busan) pitch accent: / 김 / 김까지

    Syllables in red take high pitch. This word always takes low pitch, and heightens the pitch of two subsequent suffixed syllables.

Noun[edit]

(gim)

  1. laver (nori, a type of edible seaweed in the genus Porphyra)
    Synonyms: (rare) 해태(海苔) (haetae), (chiefly dialectal) 해의(海衣) (hae'ui)
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

First attested in the Worin seokbo (月印釋譜 / 월인석보), 1459, as Middle Korean 김〯 (Yale: kǐm).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ki(ː)m]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gim
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gim
McCune–Reischauer?kim
Yale Romanization?kīm
  • South Gyeongsang (Busan) pitch accent: / 김 / 김까지

    Syllables in red take high pitch. This word always takes low pitch, and heightens the pitch of two subsequent suffixed syllables.

Noun[edit]

(gim)

  1. steam; vapor
    Synonyms: 증기(蒸氣) (jeunggi, vapour), 수증기(水蒸氣) (sujeunggi, steam)

Etymology 3[edit]

Of native Korean origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gim
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gim
McCune–Reischauer?kim
Yale Romanization?kim

Dependent noun[edit]

(gim)

  1. since, given that, seeing as; only used in 은 김에 (-eun gime) and 는 김에 (-neun gime)

Etymology 4[edit]

First attested in the Worin seokbo (月印釋譜 / 월인석보), 1459, as Middle Korean 기ᅀᅳᆷ〮 (Yale: kìzúm), originally equivalent to 기ᇫ (Yale: kìz-, “to be lush, to be verdant (of plant growth)”) + 음〮 (Yale: úm, substative-deriving suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ki(ː)m]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gim
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gim
McCune–Reischauer?kim
Yale Romanization?kīm

Noun[edit]

(gim)

  1. weed in fields or rice paddies, which must be uprooted
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Sino-Korean word from (gold; metal). This reading is found only in the surname and certain place names. Orthodox Sino-Korean is (, geum).

Most likely a borrowing from Early Mandarin (EM *kim) during Mongol rule in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gim
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gim
McCune–Reischauer?kim
Yale Romanization?kim

Proper noun[edit]

(Gim) (hanja )

  1. A surname​, Kim (most common surname in Korea)
    일성 (日成)Gim IlseongKim Il-sung
    정일 (正日)Gim Jeong-ilKim Jong-il
    정은 (正恩)Gim Jeong-eunKim Jong-un
Descendants[edit]
  • English: Kim
  • Ukrainian: Кім (Kim)

References[edit]

  1. ^ 권인한 (2004), “성씨 김(金)의 한자음 연원을 찾아서”, in Sae Gugeo Saenghwal[1], volume 14, issue 4, pages 143—155