-'d

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-’d

  1. (archaic or poetic) -ed.
    • Shakespeare:
      Hast thou mark’d the dawn of next?
    • William Topaz McGonagall - The Tay Bridge Disaster:
      But when the train came near to Wormit Bay,
      Boreas he did loud and angry bray,
      And shook the central girders of the Bridge of Tay
      On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
      Which will be remember'd for a very long time.
  2. Sometimes used to form the past tense of some verbs that are in the form of numerals, letters, and abbreviations, especially in online communication. Compare ’s.
    • "The eval function also compromises the security of your application, because it grants too much authority to the eval’d text." -JavaScript: The Good Parts, Douglas Crockford
    • Google Plus - You +1’d this.
    • I just lol’d but then stopped and realized this wasn’t funny.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The contracted form of the past tense marker is used when pronounced as a single consonant (unstressed e). It is archaic; the same suffix is used to contract would or had after a pronoun (see 'd). It is sometimes still used in abbreviated verbs or initialisms that function as verbs such as KO'd.
  • Compare 'd.