Bauhaus

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The Doppelwohnhaus (double dwelling house) “Fritz LangThea von Harbou” in Berlin, Germany. Designed in the Bauhaus style, it was completed in 1929.
The Isokon Long Chair, a Bauhaus-style armchair designed by Marcel Breuer in 1935–1936 and manufactured by the Isokon company.[1]

Borrowed from German Bauhaus (house of architecture), from Bau (building, construction) + Haus (house).[2] The word is derived from the Staatliches Bauhaus (State School of Construction), an art school in Weimar, Germany, founded in 1919 by German architect Walter Gropius (1883–1969).

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Bauhaus

  1. (architecture, design, also attributively) A modernist style characterized by the absence of ornamentation and by harmony between the function of a building or an object and its design.
    • 1968, 50 Years Bauhaus: German Exhibition; Royal Academy of Arts, September 21 – October 27 1968, Stuttgart: Württembergischer Kunstverein; Cambridge, Mass.: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, OCLC 886374191, page 26:
      [J]une 22 unanimous approval of the projected bauhaus building, the first of the bauhaus books appears.
    • 1974, Barbara Ann Henriksen, The Bauhaus and American Art Education (unpublished M.A. dissertation), Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin, OCLC 53789666, page 17:
      Not until the 1930's was the American public aware of the significance of the Bauhaus. Several factors contributed to this: American Bauhaus students were returning from Germany; Bauhaus design, as tubular steel chairs and lighting fixtures, were being imported from Germany; []
    • 2004, Alan Bartram, Bauhaus, Modernism and the Illustrated Book, London: British Library, →ISBN, page 49, column 2:
      While the direct impact of the iconoclastic Bauhaus typography on bookwork is limited, its indirect influence, encouraging designers such as Jan Tschichold to re-examine the whole tradition of typography and its relationship to twentieth-century life, is difficult to overestimate.
    • 2012 May 3, “Exhibition in focus: Bauhaus: Art as Life, Barbican Art Gallery”, in The Daily Telegraph[1], London:
      The Bauhaus has long been celebrated as the most influential art school of the twentieth century. The word Bauhaus means many things to many people: some are inspired by so-called ‘Bauhaus style’ – from tubular-steel furniture to the strict geometry of primary-coloured triangles, circles and squares; others worship its position as one of the greatest emblems of the Modern movement’s ambitious desire to change the world.
    • 2017 July 3, Michael Faulhaber; David Rising, “Ice Age Art, Bauhaus Buildings Highlight German UNESCO Hopes”, in U.S. News & World Report[2], [Washington, D.C.]:
      Two sites with cultural treasures separated by more than 40,000 years – caves with art dating to the Ice Age and buildings designed by a Bauhaus master less than 100 years ago – highlight Germany's submissions for the prestigious World Heritage Site designation by the U.N.'s cultural agency, UNESCO. [] The Bauhaus buildings in northeastern Germany were designed by the school's second director, Hannes Meyer.

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German[edit]

German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

Etymology[edit]

From bauen (to build) +‎ Haus (house).

Pronunciation[edit]

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Proper noun[edit]

Bauhaus n (genitive Bauhauses)

  1. Bauhaus